What You Can Learn From Olympic Athletes Like John Mayock





Today is a big day in Great Britain. It’s the first day of the Olympics which are held in London for the first time since 1948.

So for today’s blog post let’s look at the key reasons behind why athletes get so much more out of themselves than most people, and how YOU can do the same.

A common misconception about athletes in any sport is that they are super gifted or they must have been born with natural talent to get to where they are.

Although genetics can play a part, they are not the reason of their success. The reality is that the world’s top athletes are very much the same as me and you.

How do I know this?

Well, I’ve been a keen follower of athletics and many other sports all my life and I’ve learned a lot about what separates the people who become the best and the people who get nowhere.

I’ve also trained with top athletes including John Mayock who competed in 3 Olympics and got to the final on two occasions, and also won medals at other major championships.

What I’ve learned is that world class athletes develop certain skills that allow them to get much better results than everyone else.

The best part is that you can also develop these skills and become the fittest and best runner that you can possibly be. And here they are…

Consistency

To become your very best consistency is VERY important.

You need to practise, practise, practise. That way you can keep building on your fitness and running ability and keep improving until you finally reach your full potential.

Most people struggle to run consistently over a long period of time. They tend to lose motivation if they feel they are not improving quickly enough or when they get an injury. Or life gets in the way and they believe they haven’t got enough time.

Top athletes think much differently. They are willing to train week after week, month after month, year after year, and get on with it rather than finding reasons why they can’t run.

Yes they can train full time and they get paid to do it, but it wasn’t always like that. They spent year after year of consistent practise long before they reached the top.

Determination and commitment

There’s a saying that "When the going gets tough, the tough get going".

For most people, when the going gets tough that’s when they decide to jump ship. They are willing to quit at the first sign of defeat or as soon as they reach a difficult period.

Top athletes don’t wilt and give up, they do the opposite. They become even more determined and committed.

They think about how they can get past their struggles and what they can do to improve, rather than looking for the quickest and easiest way out.

Because of this they just keep getting better and better whereas the person who quits gets nowhere, even though they both had the same ability.

You know, I used to train with someone who had great potential. The only problem was his determination and commitment. As soon as the going got hard he disappeared for weeks at a time. The result?

His ability counted for nothing because he didn’t have enough determination and commitment to succeed.

Willingness to learn

All successful people in any field, including top athletes, are willing and eager to learn.

John Mayock learned from a coach who had successfully trained an Olympic medal winner. He also went to Morocco to train with the mile world record holder Hicham El Guerrouj and learn from the best runners in the world.

For myself, I learned from the same coach as John, I trained with athletes like John, I’ve read countless books, done coaching courses, and learned from other coaches. All this was in the pursuit of being the best that I can be and to help other people do the same.

For many people though they are not willing to learn. It feels too much like hard work. It takes up too much time. It costs money.

So they try to do everything on their own rather than taking the much easier and faster route which is to learn from someone else’s knowledge and experience.

By the way, if you would like to learn directly from me here’s where you can find out more: Running and Wight Loss Coaching

Being the best

Being the best doesn’t mean beating everybody else, it means getting the best out of yourself.

Top athletes are always trying to improve. They want to become the very best version of themselves that they can be.

They might not be able to make it right to the top, but they never stop striving to be the best that they can be. And it’s this that drives them on to continuous improvement and such a high level of performance.

On the other hand, how many people settle for the health, fitness, and body they are not happy with?

They settle for a version of themselves that is nowhere near as good as what it could be. They are satisfied with poor or average, rather than striving to be the best that they can.

These skills are available to you

An interesting thing about John Mayock was that he had an older sister. When they were younger she was seen to have much more potential than him, yet he got to the top and she didn’t.

It wasn’t his ability that got him there. It was his consistency, determination and commitment, willingness to learn, and wanting to become the best that he could.

It’s exactly the same for you. Your success with running does not come down to your running ability. It comes down to the skills that you develop that will enable you to become the fittest and best runner you can.

The skills that I’ve talked about here are available to everyone and that includes YOU.

They can all be learned and they can all be developed with practise, and the more you develop these skills the better runner you’ll become.

James

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